Recent Water Damage Posts

Vanity Left Wet

6/14/2020 (Permalink)

Darkly stained and damaged interior of a bathroom vanity Vanity not dried after a water damage loss.

Drying a water damage out as quickly as possible does make a difference.

This is a picture of a vanity which suffered water damage and didn't get dried properly. 

Hey, we get it.  Hopefully this is a once in a lifetime experience for folks.  We kid people that you don't want to know a whole lot about what we do.  That would mean you have probably had it happen to you before.

This vanity was kind of a cross between not knowing just what to do and the Covid-19 virus confusion.

The vanity is still drying out, weeks after the loss date, but is heavily damaged and probably unhealthy.

SERVPRO of Waco, a restoration company, was able to get the insurance claim unstuck and moving on this Waco water damaged home. 

SERVPRO of Waco has been serving the greater Waco and Central Texas area for over 19 years.

(254) 756-4300

Mold Assessment

6/14/2020 (Permalink)

The Mold Tester/Assessor works for you!

The Mold Remediation Contractor works for you!

Be sure they stay separate!

Sometimes there is confusion about testing for mold and removing mold. 

Texas also has rules governing the mold testing and removal industries.  These can be found on their websites.

What you always want is for the person/company testing for mold, and making recommendations of how to remove it, to work for you.  It is important they be separate from the company actually removing the mold, etc.

Beware of any mold tester/assessor who recommends only one remediation contractor/company to you.

Also beware if a mold remediation contractor/company recommends only one mold tester/assessor to you.

It is extremely important that these two persons/companies work directly for you and not in cahoots with each other.  

All the old rip off stories are true.

At SERVPRO of Waco, a restoration company, we are licensed for mold removal and have been helping scores of folks in the greater Waco and Central Texas area through mold damage for the past 19 years.

If you call us first, we'll have a look at the situation and provide you with a list of qualified assessors we have encountered over the years.

Then we will remove under the assessor's guidelines.

Let us help you! (254) 756-4300)

Left in place wet Laminate Flooring

6/10/2020 (Permalink)

Flooring planks warped up and broken in places Hall laminate floors not removed or dried after a bathroom sink pipe water damage

Laminate flooring in a significant water leak/over flow situation doesn't fare well.  Even after extracting, water is normally still under the flooring. 

Many laminate floors have a pad or cushion under the floor.  This is referred to as a floating floor.

Yes, I am holding back the pun about the floor, the water and the floating.

The cushion really does just become a sponge under the flooring, often with water trapped above the cushion and below the cushion.

Removal of the flooring is really the only solution for a laminate floor which has been significantly flooded.

The laminate flooring pictured, from a Waco home, was extracted by the homeowners but not removed, or any drying attempt.  The flooring has swelled and also suffered loss of some of the top, decorative layer.

At SERVPRO of Waco, a restoration company,  we have decades of experience with wet flooring, including lots of laminate ones.  Occasionally, in a light damage situation with coverage/budget concerns, the floors can be dried with minimal damage.

Call us at (254) 756-4300

Serving the greater Waco and Central Texas since 2001.

Carpet Pad with Moisture Barrier

3/2/2020 (Permalink)

Water poured onto the back side of a carpet pad and not coming through the moisture barrier This is what happens to water/liquids which get under a carpet pad and can't be extracted or evaporate through a moisture barrier.

We sometimes encounter wet carpeting with a moisture barrier in water damaged areas. 

Guess there can be a pretty strong attraction to them as an extra charge upgrade.  If something gets spilled, by the kids, grand kids or...pets, it doesn't soak on through the carpeting down into the pad.  It is also theoretically easier to clean up since it is right on the surface until you can wipe it up.

There are two cons to these moisture barriers.  Should anything happen where some water of quantity gets on the floor or a spill is near the edge/seam, the liquid will go under the pad.  Under the pad means under the moisture barrier.  It is essentially on the wrong side of the barrier.  

Pulling the carpet back, and probably removing the padding is the only choice to get the water/liquid out.  Very disruptive.

Also, can't say I am in favor of anything that traps moisture inside a building.  It doesn't evaporate well at all and can lead to other, undesirable consequences.

Big Trouble from this Little Faucet

3/2/2020 (Permalink)

janitor closet faucet with the wall cut out around it So harmless looking.

Ever think about all the plumbing and fixtures which go into a large buildings designed for thousands of guests?

Even in new houses/remodels, all the new plumbing in the walls, at the fixtures, etc.

And they either work right, or they don't.  Things happen.

The water supply to this little fixture here almost brought a major high profile construction project to its knees, close to the project delivery date.  Yes, it leaked, big time.

SERVPRO of Waco was brought in for extraction and drying. 

Fortunately, the nearby stairwell and mechanicals (unfortunately) drained the bulk of the water. 

Our job got smaller and smaller as we approached the site.  Still there was work to be done.

Wonder if the custodial staff these days has any idea what happened from this little sink area?

The PUMP HOUSE

11/25/2019 (Permalink)

Old, weathered country pump house The PUMP HOUSE - got to love it!

We finally found it. 

While removing trim from very wet walls on a Hamilton, TX area ranch, water suddenly began to flow from the wall. 

Seems we pulled off a piece of trim which had been nailed into a water pipe when the home was built.

The house was quite a distance, and two gates from the road.  a quick look around the grass area surrounding the house didn't have a turn off.

Calling our contact, over 100 miles away, found that the two people who knew where the shut off was were unavailable and a spouse, in panic, was trying to locate someone who knew.

We went to the road and walked up and down the mowed area there by the entrance. Nothing there.

Finally, the spouse called back with news of a pump house but didn't know where it was.  Once we knew what we were looking for we were able to find the pump house and shut off the water.

As the home had a water damage already, the water that flowed onto the floor was easily removed.

Just love the name "Pump House".  So appropriate on a hunting/cattle ranch in the country.!

SERVPRO of Waco, a restoration company, has served folks in the greater Waco and Central Texas area with exceptional service since 2001!

Water Heater Burst

6/12/2019 (Permalink)

It burst at the seams.

Something sound like it popped/burst?

Sometimes we forget that since our water heater actually heats the water, it can also build up pressure...steam pressure.

All water heaters have a pressure release valve designed to open up when the pressure begins to build.

Sometimes, rarely, debris/deposits get into the vale and prevent it from opening.

It is unlikely it is going to shoot through the roof or spew steam all over everything wildly.  It is likely the water tank inside the heater will pop open.  That means a sudden release of water as happened with the one pictured.

This one was a 50 gallon capacity heater.  The person taking a shower at the other end of the house heard it, as did the young persone in the next room from the water heater.  Within moments they began to see water coming into rooms and down the hall. 

Water from the heater came out very qucikly and by the time it finished leaking and the water to the heater was shut off, about one fourth of their home was very wet.

If you hear a pop, don't for get to have a fast look at your water heater.

Water Meter Moving

6/10/2019 (Permalink)

Typical water meter face

Water bills high?

Water where there shouldn't be and can't find out where it comes from? 

A good way to tell if you have a pipe leak in your home/building is by checking the water meter.

The water meter is usually out near the property line or street/alley.

After lifting the lid on the meter a meter face with dials/numbers should be visible.  If it is not you may need to wipe it off or gently dig a bit to find it.

The meter face generally has a wheel of some sort, such as the asterisk one shown in the picture, which moves if any water is moving through the pipe.  Generally, the more water going through it the faster it spins.

Be sure anything in the house/building which uses water is off and see if the wheel is moving.  Sometimes the movement can be very, very slow.

The face of the meter usually has a line at the top or bottom behind the wheel so you can tell if the wheel is moving slowly.

If the wheel is not moving, there is no leak in the water pipes.  The meter does not measure water in drains of from devices such as air conditioning units.

If the wheel is moving with everything shut off, there is a leak on the property/in the building somewhere.  One may well need a plumber at that point

The Wet Spot

6/10/2019 (Permalink)

A wet spot in the yard most likely a water pipe leaking, though not in the building.

Wet, maybe very green, spot in the yard?

It is a pretty sure bet an unexplained wet spot out in the yard/property is a water pipe or drain problem.

There have probably been higher than normal water bills leading up to a spot/area such as this.

For some reason, these spots are good at occurring where folks don't go into the yard/property very much.

It is a pretty sure sign a plumber is needed.

Ironically, this one was found outside a home which had a small, bet very smelly fire.  The spot kept slowly getting wetter with any water being used in the home, so it was most likey a water pipe instead of a drain pipe.  A drain pipe would only leak when water water turned on.

Wet Engineered Wood FLoor

2/14/2019 (Permalink)

Water beneath an engineered wood floor.

Wood floors, or anything that looks like wood floors, are wildly popular in home decorating.

Engineered wood floors are nice, higher end floors where the body of the flooring piece is a plywood or layered wood with a veneered wood layer on the top of the piece.

In a water damage, the water can go over the floor and under the floor.  The water is absorbed from beneath and through all the spaces between the individual pieces.

Often the floor will need replaced.

The floor pictured also had a vapor barrier mat beneath it.  The water in this case ran over the floor and down onto the mat. The water did not get below the mat to any large degree however.

Usually engineered floors are glued down with a honey type glue, and are difficult to remove.

Heat Waves and AC Water Leaks

6/1/2018 (Permalink)

Strategically placed bucket catching water from an AC condensate line blockage in the China Spring area. It can happen with any AC system.

It looks like (and feels like) hot humid weather has come early to Waco and Central Texas.

It may be a long hot summer.

Our air conditioning systems are going to get quite a workout.

One problem which pops up virtually every time intense heat arrives and stays is a blockage of the water drain line from the unit inside the building to where it runs out on the ground outside the building.

They call this the condensate line as the water is formed from condensation in the cooling process.

This almost always leaks right at the air handler (furnace) inside the building and comes out into the building, such as this unit in the China Spring, TX, area

It can be especially bad if the unit is next to a closet or room which no one enters regularly and can go undetected for a while.

You might want to have a look inside the closet/room where the AC unit is located and adjacent rooms.  Just to be sure no funny business is going on there.

Things you can do to help prevent an AC leak include:

  • Pull off the top part of the pipe and pour bleach down the pipe at the unit.  Plumbers seem to swear by this.
  • Actually blow down the pipe in a big burst of air.  This will work to unclog the pipe sometimes too.  Yes it sounds gross and would probably be a younger male convinced to do it. (Or an older, gritty male)
  • Check outside where the line should be draining onto the ground and be sure water is coming out and it is not blocked...or in the ground!

Should you find water damage in your building leaking from the AC system, call SERVPRO of Waco to get it extracted and dried properly in Waco and Central Texas.

Call us anytime! 

Headed Out of Town for Vacation?

5/7/2018 (Permalink)

For heaven's sake don't turn off your water at the street while you are gone, there won't be any chance of a big water surprise when you get back home.  Everyone likes a little excitement.

And they don't sell those inexpensive, easy to use tools to shut the water off at any stores near you, so there is no since in looking.

It's just fate the water leaks when you're gone.

Of course, no one in your home or business should know how to turn the water to the building  off quickly.  Fifteen or forty five minutes to find the cut off should be OK, the water tower won't just keep sending more water.

And if the meter/valve box needs to have dirt and debris cleaned out of it before the valve can be closed...it's some more excitement.  Right?

A/C drain line blockages

8/17/2017 (Permalink)

With the hot weather we are getting calls for water leaking from the inside air conditioning unit because of a plugged drain line.

Had a look at your unit lately?

Might want to check rooms and closets that share a common wall with the inside A/C unit, particularly if you don't go in there regularly.

The drain line is usually a white pvc pipe and is on the front(ish) area of the indoor unit. most have a small stem sticking up with a drain cap snugged onto it.  The cap can be removed with out too much trouble.

SOMETIMES blowing on the open end of the pipe will dislodge what ever is causing the problem.  Yes it sounds gross, but really it is clean water and a pipe with a little dust on it (which could be wiped off).

Most likely you will need an A/C technician.

While we aren't experts on unclogging the A/C drain line...we are experts on getting the water out of your home/building and getting things dried out.